Monday, September 21, 2009

Healing Our World

From an email I got today...
The term "warrior" in the Shambhala tradition is a translation of the Tibetan word pawo. Pa means "brave," and wo makes it "a person who is brave." The warrior tradition we are discussing is a tradition of bravery. You might have the idea of a warrior as someone who wages war. But in this case, we are not talking about warriors as those who engage in warfare. Warriorship here refers to fundamental bravery and fearlessness. Warriorship is based on overcoming cowardice and our sense of being wounded.If we feel fundamentally wounded, we may be afraid that somebody is going to put stitches in us to heal our wound. Or maybe we have already had the stitches put in, but we dare not let anyone take them out. The approach of the warrior is to face all those situations of fear or cowardice. The general goal of warriorship is to have no fear. But the ground of warriorship is fear itself. In order to be fearless, first we have to find out what fear is.

From "Facing Yourself," in Smile at Fear: Awakening the True Heart of Bravery, coming in October from Shambhala Publications.

“This is powerful dharma encouragement to awaken our own fearless and wise heart - from one of the most remarkable and brilliant teachers of modern times.” — Jack Kornfield

7 comments:

moquiti said...

I'm thinking that fear is a reality, but that in the face of fear, action is an option for the warrior, whereas for others, fear can prevent or obscure the possibility of action. Either way, fear exists.

emdot said...

I agree. :)

emdot said...
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好熱 said...
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好極了 said...
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romanlily said...

OK, this is not really on topic. But I just though I'd say that I miss your blog, and hope you are well.

LucianoLWoodell said...
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